The Page – August 5, 2020

Change your vehicle license plates. Ride A bicycle. Take public transit. Those are suggestions from British Columbia premier John Horgan to any Albertans thinking of holidays in that fine province.
Apparently, some Albertans vacationing in BC have been harassed by the locals.
It’s all part of the isolation stuff we are all supposed to be practising in this time of Covid-19.
As for us, we really don’t need any reasons to take a pass on a trip to our neighbouring province. Been there. Done that. Don’t like seaweeds and dead fish washing up on saltwater shores. And of course, always fed up with leaving a campground at 7 in the morning just to hopefully get a spot at the next one. Wait! We almost forgot to mention the summer fire bans. What kind of summer is it without a campfire?
And now, here we have to worry about getting yelled at, or worse, by some anger Columbians with nothing better to do, mad at us for visiting their fair province. Thanks, but no thanks.
As for Horgan? Nice going. Blame the Albertans, not his own people. Says Horgan, “I can’t tell people how to respond when they see an offshore plate.”
Sure you can. Any real leader would find it easy.

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Just to be fair, there are a few reports of BC folks being harassed by Albertans. Idiots. The Albertans harassing, that is.

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You know those old guys at the coffee shop? Well, no offence but their thoughts have mostly kinda turned from passion to pensions.
We shouldn’t talk. Most days we find it harder and harder to make ends meet. Especially fingers and toes.

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It’s called Ryan’s Application of Parkinson’s Law: Possessions increase to fill the space available for their storage.

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Here’s a Tip of the Page Hat to Marcel Duschesneau and Jim Trevors of Joussard and High Prairie respectively. Jim has a cabin right beside Marcel’s home in Joussard.
Both places are on the edge of Lesser Slave Lake.
Both guys were alerted to cries for help from a pair of canoeists who had capsized.
Like good citizens, they rescued the floundering canoeists.
Good work to the pair – Jim and Marcel that is.

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It’s interesting we often do not think of drownings in Alberta, but in fact they happen a lot.
We looked for statistics but only found a few numbers from past years.
19 drownings in 2017. 14 in 2016. But the Alberta Lifesaving Society says the number is actually closer to 40.
Drownings happen on sunny days. On rivers. Usually when people are enjoying themselves and least expect it.
According to one report, only 11 per cent of drownings in Canada are related to powerboat activities.
But, boating activities caused an average of 124 drownings each year across Canada between 2004 and 2013.
One fact remains, if you aren’t wearing a lifejacket on a boat, be darn sure there is one handy.
Four people on a boat on Sylvan Lake went into the water in mid-August a few years ago when their boat tipped over.
Three were able to put on lifejackets.
The fourth didn’t, and drowned. His body was found 6 days later.
Quebec this year has already seen 58 drownings.
One official says parents not supervising their kids is often a drowning factor.
“We see them distracted on their phones, reading a book, or talking in a conversation to someone else,” says Kelly Carter of the Lifesaving Society of Alberta and NW Territories. “Drowning being silent, they’re not able to hear their child in distress. They have to be able to see it, and they have to be close enough to be able to respond,” he said.
So let’s have fun, but let’s be safe out there.

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